UPDATE: 05.Sept.2019: Chief Executive Carrie Lam ensured that the extradiction bill proposal has now been also formally withdrawn, but didn't fullfil the other 4 demands an also hasn't stepped down. The protests therefore continue.

- Massive Hong Kong Protests Continue Despite Rain              

HongKong protests unabated - here near Mina Ma. Photo: Jennifer Creery/HKFP 

- None of the 5 Demands have been fulfilled or adhered to by stubborn HK governance.

- BE LIKE WATER is a very successful protest strategy.

18. August 2019

The 2019 Hong Kong anti-extradition bill protests are a series of demonstrations in Hong Kong against an extradition bill proposed by the government of Hong Kong. If enacted, the bill would allow local authorities to detain and extradite people who are wanted in territories that Hong Kong does not have extradition agreements with, including mainland China and Taiwan. Some fear the bill would place Hong Kongers and visitors under mainland Chinese jurisdiction, undermining the autonomy of the region and citizens' rights.

Don't get fooled - there are two gigantic powerplays overshadowing and infiltrating the protests of the rightful, genuine people of HongKong and their families: On the one side China, which doesn't want to wait another 28 years until HongKong is set to be fully swallowed by the mainland governance and on the other hand the Anlo-American conglomerate and their vassals in cohorts with oligarchs and corporations that want to maintain their stronghold in that region as long as possible. Both do not serve the interest of the genuine people, who want peace, and prosperity for the HongKong families and their youth, the guaranteed rights to have a say, the full rights to vote and to decide about their governance - at least for the next 28 years as guaranteed (but never fulfilled) by the Basic Law given during the handover as condition to be respected.

The real people of Hong Kong demand:

1) The legally guaranteed complete withdrawal of the extraition bill, [a verbal statement saying that "the bill is dead" is not sufficient.]

2) The withdrawal of the “riot” characterisation of the June 12 protests [under which the arrested protesters are charged],

3) The unconditional release of all arrested protesters,

4) The formation of an independent commission of inquiry into police behaviour (i.e. the police brutality),

5) And last but not least The Universal Suffrage. [Important is to understand that HongKong is still governed like a colony and due to that lost economically over the last years tremendously with no hope for a good future for the young generations. While on the mainland the neighbouring city of Shenzen is booming, HongKong is in dramatic economic decline. The deployment of tanks and armoured vehicles along the boundary to Shenzhen was therefore not a sign of China's readiness to invade Hongkong with troops from mainland China, but to protect Shenzhen from a likely overspill of rioters and looters encouraged by agents provocateurs sent by the USA as well as China into the protest of the peaceful masses of genuine people of HongKong.]

Demonstrations against the bill began in March and April, but escalated in June. Hundreds of thousands of people marched in protests of the bill on 9 June. Protests on 12 June, the day the bill was scheduled to a second reading in the Legislative Council, marked a sharp escalation in violence. Riot police employed tear gas and rubber bullets against demonstrators. Subsequently, investigations into police behaviour and greater accountability for their actions became part of protester demands. A larger march occurred on 16 June with estimates of up to 2mio HongKongers protesting. 

On 1 July, hundreds of thousands of people participated in the annual July marches. A portion of these demonstrators split from the march and broke into the Legislative Council Complex, vandalising central government symbols.

Chief Executive Carrie Lam suspended the extradition bill on 15 June, saying it was "dead" on 9 July. She did not say the bill would be fully withdrawn. Executive Council members Regina Ip and Bernard Charnwut Chan said that the government does not intend to make further concessions.

Protests continued through the summer, escalating into increasingly violent confrontations between police, activists, pro-Beijing triad members, and local residents in over 20 different neighbourhoods throughout the region, such as 22 July 2019 Yuen Long attack. As demonstrations continue, protesters are calling for an independent inquiry on police brutality, the release of arrested protesters, a retraction of the official characterisation of the protests as "riots", and direct elections to choose Legislative Council members and the Chief Executive. Last week Hong Kong's international airport was closed twice due to the protest. Many stranded travellers showed sympathy with the protesters.

Key problem is that HongKong, since the 1997 handing over of HongKong from the British overlords to China under the one state two systems clause, HongKongers have only a Basic Law - like every "brave" colony - and don't have a constitution given and agreed to by its people. That and the fact that there is no real governance by the people of HongKong has created the biggest obstacles to allow HongKong to respond to the economic challenges and especially the younger generations do not see any  future for themselves in HongKong unless that is changed and until the whole show will anyway end in 28 years when the 50 year two-systems period will appruptly end and HongKong fully swallowed by China. 

Get some good background information from the following videos:

But understand also that the situation is used by another foreign hidden hand - the USA:

Hongkongers ignore protest restrictions and threats from Beijing as hundreds of thousands rally against gov’t

By Jennifer Creery - HKFP & VF / ET - 18. August 2019

Hundreds of thousands flocked to Victoria Park on Sunday under torrential rain in another mass pro-democracy protest against the government and alleged police violence.

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Photo: May James/HKFP.

Protesters of all ages – many clad in black, the colour of the anti-extradition law movement – spilt out of the nearby MTR stations.

august 18 CHRF china extradition

Photo: May James/HKFP.

The metro system implemented crowd control measures, with delays of around 15 to 30 minutes on the Tsuen Wan Line and Island Line.

august 18 CHRF china extradition

Photo: May James/HKFP.

Crowds chanted “free Hong Kong, democracy now” and “fill up Victoria Park.”

august 18 CHRF china extradition

Photo: May James/HKFP.

Earlier this week, police issued a letter of no objection for a static demonstration in Victoria Park between 10am to 11pm, but objected to the original plan to march to Chater Road in Central: “The possible gathering of dissidents due to the nature of the event, and which may lead to breach of peace or other unlawful activities,” the police notice read.

august 18 CHRF china extradition

Photo: May James/HKFP.

Organisers, the Civil Human Rights Front, appealed saying: “We are very unhappy with this decision and believe it will endanger a large number of people set to participate.”

august 18 CHRF china extradition

Photo: May James/HKFP.

But the appeals board ruled against them. In response, the Front said that – when the park is full – protesters will be guided out towards Causeway Bay MTR station. If the station becomes blocked, crowds would be ushered to leave via Wan Chai, Admiralty and Central stations – a move that would result in a de facto march.

august 18 CHRF china extradition

Photo: May James/HKFP.

At around 2.30pm, organisers announced that crowds had filled up all six football pitches in the park. Shortly afterwards, thousands of demonstrators began marching through Causeway Bay and Wan Chai as heavy rain began to fall.

august 18 CHRF china extradition

Photo: May James/HKFP.

Ann Lau, a senior lecturer at the Chinese University of Hong Kong in her 40s, told HKFP she believed that the government and chief executive had no interest in opening up a dialogue with protesters in order to resolve the current political crisis: “Carrie Lam said she wants to respond to citizens but she hasn’t even opened up a channel to talk with the public,” she said. “I don’t think the government has any interest in talking to the public.”

august 18 CHRF china extradition

Ann Lau. Photo: Jennifer Creery/HKFP.

Lau added that nowadays there are fewer ways for the public to legally voice their discontent: “The police try to refuse all protest applications. We kind of feel like even if we want to voice our opinions peacefully, they don’t even give us a chance to do so. They are forcing us to go to the street so that they can call it illegal,” she said. “Well, what do you want us to do? We have no choice.”

august 18 CHRF china extradition

Photo: May James/HKFP.

Protester injuries 

A woman who was shot at with a suspected bean bag round last Sunday may lose her sight in her right eye. Her injury prompted a chorus of criticism from anti-government protesters who blasted the police for alleged excessive use of force.

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Photo: May James/HKFP.

Mina Ma, a 40-year-old administrative worker, told HKFP she decided to attend Sunday’s rally to protest a range of political issues but mainly in response to the woman who was shot in the eye.

“This incident — I was really very angry and upset,” she said. “I could not just sit at home after I heard about this.”

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Mina Ma. Photo: Jennifer Creery/HKFP.

Ma added that she thought the police would not conduct a clearance operation on Sunday, despite prohibiting the original plan to march to Central: “I believe all Hongkongers are peaceful and I still believe the government and police will not disrupt a peaceful gather. I hope so,” she said.

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Photo: May James/HKFP.

Former lawmaker Lee Cheuk-yan told HKFP that crowds were only able to leave the park by marching towards Central in accordance with the police’s restrictions.

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Lee Cheuk-yan. Photo: Jennifer Creery/HKFP.

“The police are forcing people to go out [like this] because the park is not suitable to accommodate so many people,” he said. “When we leave, we are not breaching the police requirements because the police told us we have to leave, so we are cooperating with them.”

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Photo: May James/HKFP.

As the city nears its eleventh consecutive week of protest, sparked by the government’s now-suspended extradition bill, groups have taken up increasingly creative methods to organise hit-and-run demonstrations and impromptu road occupations.

august 18 CHRF china extradition

Photo: May James/HKFP.

Over the weekend, protesters adopted a new communications tactic to avoid being “infiltrated” or targeted with cyber abuse from so-called internet trolls — writing in romanised Cantonese. The practice uses the Latin alphabet to phonetically transcribe characters, confusing machine translation services and even those fluent in Mandarin Chinese.

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Photo: May James/HKFP.

Beijing has ramped up its rhetoric on Hong Kong’s protests with officials repeatedly blaming the unrest on “violent radicals” and “foreign forces.” Yang Guang, spokesman for the Hong Kong and Macao Affairs Office of the State Council, last Monday described the movement as displaying signs of “terrorism.”

august 18 CHRF china extradition

Photo: May James/HKFP.

Meanwhile, state media the People’s Daily and the Global Times has published a slew of videos depicting military drills and armoured vehicles driving to Shenzhen, which borders Hong Kong.

- # -

‘All five demands must be fulfilled’: Thousands of Hong Kong anti-extradition law protesters rally in Sha Tin

- HKPF -14. July 2019

Hundreds of thousands have marched in Sha Tin, urging the Hong Kong government to meet their demands over the now-suspended extradition bill.

july 14 sha tin china extradition

Photo: Kris Cheng/HKFP.

They called for a complete withdrawal of the bill, the withdrawal of the “riot” characterisation of the June 12 protests, the unconditional release of all arrested protesters, the formation of an independent commission of inquiry into police behaviour, as well as universal suffrage.

Marchers also condemned the “violent clearance” of the demonstrations in Kowloon last Sunday.

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Photo: Kris Cheng/HKFP.

Demonstrators began the march early owing to a high turnout, chanting “all five demands must be fulfilled” and “Hong Kong police break laws.”

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Photo: Kris Cheng/HKFP.

Organisers said that, as of 5.30pm, more than 100,000 people had passed through Hilton Plaza alone.

july 14 sha tin china extradition

Photo: Jennifer Creery/HKFP.

Mr Chan, who led a group of protesters bearing the US flag, said they wanted Washington to pass the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act and secure universal suffrage for the Legislative Council for 2020.

july 14 sha tin china extradition

Photo: Kris Cheng/HKFP.

Chan said they organised themselves online: “The bill will be very useful… we have been speaking to US lawmakers on Facebook, Twitter, and also the Hong Kong community in the US to ask them to urge lawmakers to pass it,” he said.

Hong Kong Free Press@HongKongFP

 · 

 

Replying to @HongKongFP and 2 others

A protester at the front of the march attempts to obscure the view of a cameraman who is thought to be working for TVB - a broadcaster that has been accused of bias favouring the police. https://www.hongkongfp.com/2019/07/14/five-demands-must-fulfilled-thousands-hong-kong-anti-extradition-law-protesters-rally-sha-tin/ …

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Hong Kong Free Press@HongKongFP

The crowd stretches across a flyover as people reach the rally's endpoint near New Town Plaza in Sha Tin.https://www.hongkongfp.com/2019/07/14/five-demands-must-fulfilled-thousands-hong-kong-anti-extradition-law-protesters-rally-sha-tin/ …

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Wildy Chan, a 40-year-old teacher, told HKFP he wanted Chief Executive Carrie Lam and police chief Stephen Lo to be held responsible for the use of “extreme violence” by police against protesters in recent weeks.

Wildy Chan

Wildy Chan. Photo: Jennifer Creery/HKFP.

“Most of the protesters are peaceful so it is unreasonable for them to beat them up in this way,” he said. “They have no weapons. They are only wearing masks.”

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A banner takes aim at a western police officer accused of approving the use of tear gas. Photo: Kris Cheng/HKFP.

Another protester – Ms Chan, a former journalist – said all five demands must be met by the government. She said she believed the study launched by the Independent Police Complaints Council would not bear any results because of its lack of legal power.

Hong Kong Free Press@HongKongFP

 

Replying to @HongKongFP and 2 others

The protesters removed police cordons outside New Town Plaza and opened up the adjacent road. https://www.hongkongfp.com/2019/07/14/five-demands-must-fulfilled-thousands-hong-kong-anti-extradition-law-protesters-rally-sha-tin/ … @krislc @creery_j

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She said a commission of inquiry should be formed with a judge leading it: “At least we will see it as a fair investigation.”

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Mrs Chan (centre). Photo: Kris Cheng/HKFP.

She said she did not accept Chief Executive Carrie Lam’s apology, because she believed Lam was not sincere after the untimely death of four protesters. “[Lam] treats our lives as nothing,” she said.

Hong Kong Free Press@HongKongFP

 

Replying to @HongKongFP and 2 others

Crowds filled the lanes along Sha Tin Centre Street. They chanted “all five demands must be fulfilled.” https://www.hongkongfp.com/2019/07/14/five-demands-must-fulfilled-thousands-hong-kong-anti-extradition-law-protesters-rally-sha-tin/ …

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Tobias Leung, the convener of Shatin Commons who applied for a letter of no objection from the police, told HKFP that they initially applied for the letter expecting 1,000 people to march. However, they expected 10,000 to turn up after last Sunday’s rally attracted 230,000, according to organisers.

july 14 sha tin china extradition

Photo: Jennifer Creery/HKFP.

Demonstrators marched from Chui Tin Street Soccer Pitch in Tai Wai, via Che Kung Temple MTR station and the Hong Kong Heritage Museum, to the Sha Tin Government Offices.

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Photo: Kris Cheng/HKFP.

As the day wore on, clashes broke out as police in riot gear arrived on the scene.

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Photo: Kris Cheng/HKFP.

Protesters uprooted road barriers to use as barricades and passed supplies such as umbrellas to the frontlines.

Hong Kong Free Press@HongKongFP

 

‘All five demands must be fulfilled’: Thousands of Hong Kong anti-extradition law protesters rally in Sha Tinhttps://www.hongkongfp.com/2019/07/14/five-demands-must-fulfilled-thousands-hong-kong-anti-extradition-law-protesters-rally-sha-tin/ … @krislc @creery_j

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Leung said the office had disqualified up to five pro-democracy candidates in past elections and thus it was chosen as the endpoint in protest.

 

Perry Dino, an artist who has gained recognition for painting protests, told HKFP he wanted to capture the anti-extradition movement as it “blossomed” in the New Territories.

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Perry Dino. Photo: Jennifer Creery/HKFP.

“I wanted to capture a recognisable Sha Tin scene from this overpass by including the mountains in the background and the Leisure and Cultural Service Headquarters,” he said.

After the rally, Lost In the Fumes, a documentary about jailed activist Edward Leung, will be screened outside the Sha Tin Town Hall at 8pm.

MTR Service Update@mtrupdate

 

1533 Overcrowding at Tai Wai Station, Exit A - Tsuen Nam Road, Exit B - Public Transport Interchange, Exit C - Mei Tin Road, Exit D - Grandway Garden congested

Please use other exit https://twitter.com/mtrupdate/status/1150309964298088449/photo/1pic.twitter.com/WMSl2WemeV 

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The extradition bill would allow the city to handle case-by-case fugitive transfers to jurisdictions with no prior arrangements, including China. Critics have said residents would be at risk of extradition to the mainland, which lacks human rights protections.

july 14 sha tin china extradition

Photo: Inmediahk.net.

The controversy over the bill sparked large-scale protests since June, before morphing into protests over democracy, alleged police brutality and other community grievances. Chief Executive Carrie Lam declared the bill “dead” this week, but did not enact any mechanism to withdraw it or agree to other demands.

july 14 sha tin china extradition

Photo: Inmediahk.net.

 

List of August 2019 Hong Kong anti-extradition bill protests

List of July 2019 Hong Kong anti-extradition bill protests

 

UPDATE

Flashback: 

US Now Admits it is Funding “Occupy Central” in Hong Kong