Update 25. Nov. 2019: CARRIE LAM MUST STEP DOWN! We've been saying it for so long that the pro-democracy protesters in hashtag#HongKong represent the absolute majority of this city state's population, despite all the propaganda by CCP China to the contrary, and now we have proof of it. Hong Kong's District Council elections show a clear majority for the pro-sovereignty camp, who have so far won more than 300 seats, compared to about 41 seats for the pro-establishment camp, according to local media estimates. Never before a voter participation of 71% was recorded and over 90% of old and young citizens stand firm with those who waged the protests. The ongoing pro-sovereignty protests initially started over democracy demands as the "Umbrella-Reolution" over 5 years ago, but now sparked in 2019 over a finally-shelved kidnapping bill (extradition bill in doublespeak) which would have allowed the hashtag#CCP to kidnap anyone they want - whether locals or visitors - from Hong Kong on demand. The protesters are now in their 5th month, and their 5 demands are the resignation of hashtag#CarrieLam ((the puppet CEO of Hong Kong and employee of the CCP), complete withdrawal of the kidnapping bill, democratic elections in a fully autonomous city-state, the release of the protesters kidnapped by Carrie Lam's gangs, and an independent investigation into police brutality against citizens. The HK uprising is part of a larger awakening in the consciousness of citizens around the globe from Chile to France to Hong Kong to Catalonia to the Netherlands to the Czech Republic to Ecuador to Bolivia to Colombia to hashtag#Serbia to hashtag#Athens to hashtag#Iraq to hashtag#Syria to Lebanon to Egypt to Sudan to Haiti. These uprisings are all fighting one common enemy: a corrupt central government that doesn't represent them. Politicians around the world have proven themselves corrupt, and therefore, the only reasonable system of government is one without them. It's a decentralized form of government where decision-making is no longer in the hands of a few corrupt politicians in the capitals of this planet but in the hands of ALL citizens. A similar concept exists TODAY in Switzerland where political decisions are made mostly through a national referendum by ALL citizens, not behind closed doors by politicians. (With reporting by Ali Cheaib - Independent Journalist)

Update 23. Nov. 2019: A man claiming to have worked as a secret Chinese operative for five years says Beijing has directed overseas assassinations, including in HongKong, Taiwan and on Australian soil.

  • Wang Liqiang has provided new information about the kidnapping of five booksellers from Hong Kong and their rendition to mainland China, according to Nine Newspapers

  • He has also reportedly revealed information about spies from Beijing infiltrating the Hong Kong democracy movement, Taiwan's elections and involvement in Australian affairs

Update 20. Nov. 2019:  A four-day siege of Hong Kong's Polytechnic University (PolyU) is nearing an end, although dozens of protesters remain inside. Around 800 to 900 protesters have already left the campus, hundreds of whom were under 18, police said. The campus - which turned into a fiery battleground during the past week - is surrounded by police who are arresting for rioting any adults trying to leave. Some are too scared to leave as a result, leaving them trapped inside. The campus siege has been one of the most dramatic confrontations in the wider protest movement that has paralysed the city for more than five months. Police arrested around 1,100 people in and around PolyU on Tuesday alone, they said at a late night briefing.

Update 19. Nov. 2019: In a widely anticipated move, just after 6pm ET on Tuesday, the U.S. Senate unanimously passed a bipartisan bill, S.1838, showing support for pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong by requiring an annual review of whether the city is sufficiently autonomous from Beijing to justify its special trading status.The U.S. Senate just unanimously passed the “Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act of 2019”, and the Chinese are absolutely seething with anger. Also CCP China must learn that the world found out about their interference into the internal affairs and security of all the countries where they set foot - especially with their form of serious corruption and loan gagging. We have seen this especially in Africa over and over again. Enough is enough. And in addition the Chinese with their coal-plants and other pollution, incl. single-use cheap plastic crap, affect us all worldwide. It's good to set a block and to remind them that contracts and human rights must not be breached. The blood of the protesters in HK was not and must not be spilled in vein.

The Protest Core at PolyU

Students standing steadfast for justice.

By Ali Cheaib Independent Journalist - 18. November 2019

The corrupt government of hashtag#HongKong decided to storm hashtag#PolytechnicUniversity yesterday (Sunday, Nov 17) which led to violent clashes with the pro-autonomy students who were barricading there. You can clearly see in this video how Hong Kong's licensed killers (cops in doublespeak) are casually shooting protesters with rubber bullets and chemical weapons ( hashtag#teargas).

Protests are now escalating and intensifying across Hong Kong ever since hashtag#CarrieLam (the puppet CEO of Hong Kong and employee of the hashtag#CCP) has made it very clear that her government will NEVER grant the protesters their 5 demands.

The ongoing pro-sovereignty protests initially sparked over a now-shelved kidnapping bill (extradition bill in doublespeak) which would've allowed the CCP to kidnap anyone they want whether locals or visitors from Hong Kong on demand. The protesters are now in their 5th month, and their 5 demands are the resignation of Carrie Lam, complete withdrawal of the kidnapping bill, democratic elections in a fully autonomous city-state, the release of the kidnapped protesters by Carrie Lam's gangs, and an independent investigation into police brutality against citizens.

The HK uprising is part of a larger awakening in the consciousness of citizens around the globe from Chile to France to Hong Kong to Catalonia to the Netherlands to Ecuador to Bolivia to Serbia to Athens to Iraq to Syria to Lebanon to Egypt to Sudan to Haiti. These uprisings are all fighting one common enemy: a corrupt central government that doesn't represent them.

As long as CCCP China and their HK stooges are in breach of contract the struggle will continue.

Hong Kong's protests have become increasingly violent as they continue into their sixth month.

The fabric of the place is unravelling - attitudes are hardening between the demonstrators and the police, between mainlanders and Hongkongers and even down the middle of families.

WATCH THE VIDEOS

Clashes, escapes and arrests as stand-off continues at Hong Kong Polytechnic University

 

Hong Kong protests: The battle for PolyU - BBC

 

Hong Kong Polytechnic University campus has become the latest battleground for long-running anti-government protests.

The violence is some of the worst seen during months of unrest in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory.

The protests started over a controversial extradition bill, and have now evolved into broader anti-government demonstrations.

China has warned that "no-one should underestimate [its] will to safeguard its sovereignty and Hong Kong's stability", and its ambassador to the UK said the central government would not sit back and watch if the situation became "uncontrollable".

UPDATES:

US Senate backs human rights in Hong Kong

In Washington, the US Senate on Tuesday unanimously passed the "Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act," which would require the secretary of state to certify at least once a year that Hong Kong retains enough autonomy to qualify for special US trading consideration and would impose sanctions against officials responsible for human rights violations.

Beijing condemned the US Senate's move, with the Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson, Geng Shuang, criticizing it as "blatant" interference in China's internal affairs.

Geng said the legislation "paints criminal moves as the pursuit of human rights and democracy" and accused Washington of having a "hidden political agenda" to destabilize China and Hong Kong. China will take "strong countermeasures" if the proposal becomes law, Geng said.

Hong Kong Polytechnic University: Protesters still inside as standoff continues

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam has called on the remaining roughly 100 protesters to surrender. The siege has witnessed the most intense violence since anti-government demonstrations escalated more than five months ago.

An estimated 100 protesters remained trapped inside the Hong Kong's Polytechnic University Wednesday for the third consecutive day of a siege by police.

Over the past couple of days, more than 1,000 people have been arrested, authorities said

Police have surrounded the university in the center of the bustling Kowloon peninsula and are arresting anyone who leaves.

The identity crisis behind Hong Kong's protests

Between 100 to 200 protesters remain barricaded inside a Hong Kong university surrounded by police, as the standoff continues for a third day.

Those inside Polytechnic University are said to be running low on supplies.

Protesters have been inside the campus since last week, initially stopping police from entering by lighting fires and throwing petrol bombs.

Police say adults who leave will be arrested, leaving some too scared to leave.

Hundreds of protesters tried to run from campus on Monday, but many were hit with tear gas and rubber bullets and arrested.

On Tuesday, police revealed on Monday alone at the campus they used:

  • 1,458 tear gas canisters
  • 1,391 rubber bullets
  • 325 bean bag rounds
  • 265 sponge bullets

A small group managed to leave using rope ladders before being picked up by motorcycles.

Those arrested could be charged with rioting, which carries a penalty of up to 10 years in prison.

Protesters lower themselves down a rope from a bridge to a highway to escape Polytechnic University campusImage copyrightAFP
Protesters lower themselves down a rope from a bridge to a highway to escape Polytechnic University campus

On Sunday night, police warned protesters they had until 22:00 (14:00 GMT) to leave the campus.

Police later moved in, surrounding the campus, leading to protesters throwing petrol bombs and firing rocks from catapults.

The violence at PolyU is one of the biggest flare-ups Hong Kong has seen since protests broke out in June.

The mostly young protesters have five key demands including an investigation into police brutality and universal suffrage.

But underpinning it all is the fear Hong Kong's unique identity is threatened by China.

Tensions now could be further inflamed after China condemned a decision by Hong Kong's high court to overturn a ban on face-masks.

These protesters attempting to leave PolyU met with tear gas

What is happening today?

An estimated 100 to 200 protesters still remain in PolyU, authorities have said.

But a handful of protesters have been trickling out of the university, some suffering from hypothermia and leg injuries, according to news site SCMP.

One protester said he decided to come out due to "hunger and cold", adding that many inside were "hurt without enough medical supplies".

Pro-democracy lawmaker Ted Hui had earlier said protesters did not have enough supplies to "last another day".

Another 16-year-old protester told Reuters that she chose to "surrender".

"We have been trying to escape since yesterday morning. But then we couldn't find a way out [and] were afraid of being charged," she said. "This is the only way... I was quite desperate."

A total of 600 protesters have now left the campus, according to Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam.

In the early hours of Tuesday morning, more than 200 students below the age of 18 left, accompanied by various education officials, including high school principals.

Those under the age of 18 had their identities recorded and were let go. Adults were arrested.

A nun leading a protester out of PolyU
A nun leading a protester out of PolyU - Image copyright GETTY IMAGES

Ms Lam called on all protesters to surrender, saying no violence would happen if they came "out in a peaceful manner".

However, she said police would have to take "necessary action" if that changed. Separately on Tuesday, Hong Kong's new police chief took office.

Chris Tang said the force was not able to end the protests alone, saying the unrest would only end if society condemned the violence.

Map showing location of protests

The face mask ban

Hong Kong had previously banned protesters from wearing face masks - but this was deemed "unconstitutional" by the city's high court on Monday.

But now China has come out and condemned the high court's decision. It says it has the sole authority to rule on constitutional matters in the region - it is unclear what action, if any, China might take next.

According to Chinese state media outlet Xinhua, Beijing insisted on Tuesday that only China had the authority to rule on constitutional matters in Hong Kong. It condemned the Hong Kong High Court decision to veto the ban on face masks during public demonstrations.

"No other institution has the right to make judgments or decisions," said Chinese parliament spokesperson Zang Tiewei. 

The Hong Kong High Court had ruled Monday that the mask ban enacted over a month ago by Lam was unconstitutional.

This is a large part of what the on-going protests in Hong Kong are about.

Hong Kong is a part of China and many in the city fear that its freedoms - including judicial independence - are slowly being eroded.

How did we get here?

Campuses had remained relatively free of violence during the Hong Kong protests - despite the movement being led mainly by students and young people.

But after the death of a 22-year-old student, that changed.

Last week, the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) became a battleground.

Police say protesters threw petrol bombs on a major road near the university in an effort to stop traffic. Officers attempted to reclaim the road, leading to major clashes.

Police revealed on Tuesday that some 3,900 petrol bombs were found at CUHK, adding that the university had 100 litres of sulphuric and nitric acid missing.

A protester arrested while trying to leave the campus
A protester arrested while trying to leave the campus - Image copyrightREUTERS

The university then cancelled all classes for the rest of the term. Days later, protesters at PolyU also tried to block access to a key tunnel near the university.

Protests have also been held at other locations in Hong Kong.

Why are there protests in Hong Kong?

Hong Kong - a British colony until 1997 - is part of China under a model known as "one country, two systems".

Under this model, it has a high degree of autonomy and people have freedoms unseen in mainland China.

The protests started in June after the government planned to pass a bill that would allow suspects to be extradited to mainland China. Many feared this would undermine the city's freedoms and judicial independence.

The bill was eventually withdrawn, but the demonstrations continued, having evolved into a broader protest against alleged police brutality, and the way Hong Kong is administered by Beijing.

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Hong Kong protests – Cops deploy new ‘sonic weapon’ to make protesters throw up as students fear new massacre

By  - 18. November 2019

RIOT cops in Hong Kong have deployed a new "sonic weapon" to make protesters throw up as students fear a fresh massacre.

Police fired live rounds today as around 600 activists remained trapped in a university on the second day of a siege.

 Protesters and riot police clash on a bridge at Hong Kong Polytechnic University on Sunday night

Protesters and riot police clash on a bridge at Hong Kong Polytechnic University on Sunday night Credit: Getty Images - Getty

 Cops are using a high-pitched siren intended to cause nausea and disorientation, pictured above

Cops are using a high-pitched siren intended to cause nausea and disorientation, pictured above Credit: Twitter

 Clashes between activists and police continue for a sixth month in Hong Kong

Clashes between activists and police continue for a sixth month in Hong Kong Credit: Reuters

 Protesters with umbrellas and gas masks retreat from the police

Protesters with umbrellas and gas masks retreat from the police Credit: AP:Associated Press

 Police in riot gear move through a cloud of smoke at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Police in riot gear move through a cloud of smoke at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University Credit: AP:Associated Press

 Rescue workers pulled an activist from the burnt-out university building

Rescue workers pulled an activist from the burnt-out university building Credit: Reuters

 A protester is detained by riot police while attempting to leave the campus

A protester is detained by riot police while attempting to leave the campusCredit: Reuters

 

 

Hong Kong protesters trapped on campus by tear gas and water cannon as police vehicle becomes fireball after petrol bomb

Cops said the rounds were fired after a group of protesters stationed at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) used homemade fire bombs to attack an ambulance transporting a 20-year-old woman under arrest.

Officers used what they described as a "long-range acoustic device" from an armoured lorry.

The high-pitched siren was a sonic weapon intended to cause nausea and disorientation, protesters claimed.

ESCALATING VIOLENCE

Protesters who voluntarily occupied the campus now want to leave  - but claim police won't allow them to unless they give themselves up.

Police vehicles have fired volleys of tear gas and plumes of water, some of it dyed blue to stain the protesters' clothes - while activists retaliated with Molotov cocktails, bows and arrows and eggs filled with paint.

Demonstrators armed with bows and arrows last week launched flaming bows and javelins at cops as China threatened to send in troops to deal with the escalating violence.

A group of a hundred activists who tried to leave on Sunday were met with tear gas and rubber bullets.

This ongoing conflict has recalled the Tiananmen Square atrocity of 1989, when China's People's Liberation Army opened fire on pro-democracy protesters, killing thousands.

China has a garrison of up to 12,000 troops in Hong Kong.

They have kept to barracks since 1997 but Beijing has said that it will crush any attempt at independence, one of the demands being made by a small minority of protesters.

The police have formally branded the protest a riot - a crime carrying a jail term of up to ten years.

 Activists are escorted by police out of the campus of Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Activists are escorted by police out of the campus of Hong Kong Polytechnic University Credit: Reuters

 An injured protester is carried out on a stretcher bed by multiple rescue workers as police look on

An injured protester is carried out on a stretcher bed by multiple rescue workers as police look onCredit: Getty Images - Getty

 A protester is detained by police as he tries to escape from the university today

A protester is detained by police as he tries to escape from the university todayCredit: Getty Images - Getty

 An arrow fired by a protester is seen wedged into a police officer's calf

An arrow fired by a protester is seen wedged into a police officer's calf Credit: Hong Kong Police

 Protesters were seen firing flaming arrows as violent clashes continued

Protesters were seen firing flaming arrows as violent clashes continued Credit: AFP or licensors

 Clashes first broke out in June between protesters and police - and show no sign of stopping

Clashes first broke out in June between protesters and police - and show no sign of stopping Credit: Getty Images - Getty

 A protester attempts to extinguish a fire at the campus of Hong Kong Polytechnic University

A protester attempts to extinguish a fire at the campus of Hong Kong Polytechnic University Credit: Reuters

 Protesters climb a stairway filled with a makeshift barricade of chairs and other debris outside the university

Protesters climb a stairway filled with a makeshift barricade of chairs and other debris outside the university Credit: Reuters

 An activist flees the tear gas as tensions continue to escalate

An activist flees the tear gas as tensions continue to escalate Credit: Getty Images - Getty

 A protester is detained by riot police while attempting to leave the university campus

A protester is detained by riot police while attempting to leave the university campus Credit: Reuters

 The burnt out shell of the main PolyU entrance after days of clashes

The burnt out shell of the main PolyU entrance after days of clashes Credit: AFP or licensors

 A protester flanked by cops is marched away

A protester flanked by cops is marched awayCredit: AP:Associated Press

 A protester chucks a Molotov cocktail in the direction of riot cops

A protester chucks a Molotov cocktail in the direction of riot cops  Credit: AFP or licensors

Some 13 people, aged between 22 and 57, were injured on Sunday. One is in a serious condition.

Sobbing parents have been seen begging police to take their children home but in vain, while other activists are determined to stay put.

“Before I wanted to surrender, but now I’ve changed my mind,” one 16-year old boy was quoted saying.

“I don’t want to stay here any longer but I don’t want to go to prison."